No Games Here

This weekend I took all the game apps off of my iPad. You may think that that is an overreaction of spending too much time playing games. And, the day after I did so I would’ve agreed with you. Yet, it had to be done.

Games do have a tendency to reach the inner psyche and in time become habit-forming time-stealers. And it is not easy to kick the habit. Yet I have to little time and too much which I feel it is vital for me to do. Therefore, I had to make a stand, and this is it.

Right now, I am redoing a pilot course on mapping your future which I plan to have out by the end of the week. I also have another class on getting employed which I’m cleaning up and hope to have out in the next three weeks. I am studying with the NeuroLinguistic Program (NLP) Acology to start offering life coaching, and I am rewriting some of my earlier books to bring them up to date and republish them. Right now, I have way too much to accomplish and almost no time to play games.

The truth is, I like it that way. I have always been that way with any job I worked. And as I face retirement, and delve into my interests, I see no reason to change. And, although I am not trying to be the voice in the wilderness, I would like to make a recommendation.

If you have things you want to accomplish and yet have little time to do so, take a look at where you want to go and what you want to do. Try to figure out what is important for you to do, and what can be put aside. Sometimes the things we think we cannot do without, are the ones we have to set aside momentarily to make way for the larger endeavors.

With your permission, and please comment one way or the other, I would like to tell you a little bit more about what I do during this week. Some of my work might help, I would be glad to share it with you.

Until tomorrow, Have a great day.

 

 

 

 

Owed?

I have noticed that more and more people want more and more things for themselves, and they feel as though the things they want are owed to them.

I quite often ask the question, ‘Why?’ In this case, the why question is ‘Why do you feel it’s owed to you?’ This question followed by, ‘And what have you done to deserve it?’

Many people have gone over and above to earn the things they would like.  And yet, the questions above are still relevant.  Why, and What. Are you a mover and a shaker? Or are you the person who waits and then does most of what you’re told?  You showed up for work every day? That’s great. Isn’t that part of what the paycheck compensates you for?

 Did you lead a team or work personally to do something which caused revenue to grow within the company? Did you cut costs or overhead, or save the company significant amounts of money in some other way? Did you do something else that positively affected the bottom line? 

The question is what did you give to the company or others that makes you deserve the big-ticket item?

If you can’t point to something special you did, you can’t really grumble. Most people who want to earn the bonuses and rewards start off by first ensuring that the company they work for offers rewards and bonuses for excellent work.  Then find out what the criteria are for earning awards. And finally, make a plan and do what it takes.

Saying and thinking you deserve a bonus or reward and actually doing the work to earn it are two different actions. If you really want the glory, do the work.