Warning: Use Wisely

We each have freedom. We can enjoy as much freedom as we give ourselves permission to use. The question is not really who may take that freedom away, instead the real issue is how much of the available freedom do we allow ourselves to use?

If we do not allow ourselves to use what we have, it will wither and go away. Any freedom that is given and yet not used out of some fear or doubt is not genuinely free. Just remember, there is a difference between concern and responsibility.

Our freedoms do not extend to hurting others. Yelling fire in a crowded theater that causes a stampede and hurts others is wrong. No one has the right to take a life for fun or profit. And no one should purposely plan to do ill will to others.

The freedoms we enjoy are those freedoms that were earned and handed down by our forefathers to promote the common good. They also gave us a set of laws, commonly agree to, and lived by which uphold those freedoms. Most of these laws are still used and respected today.

Our freedoms stem from a group of colonies agreeing to work together and signing up to throw off the yoke of tyranny. And, banding together for the common good and inalienable rights of all. We need to remember this as we go forward. We need to enjoy our freedoms and protect them from those who abuse them. Because the surest way to lose anything is to abuse it.

Just something to think about from the mean old Master Sergeant.

Thanks for being with me today, I hope to be with you again soon.

The Cost of Freedom

Good morning.

One of the things I got to do my last tour in the Air Force was to manage some special projects. One day when returning from an off-site meeting, I drove back to base with my commander in my immediate supervisor in the car.

As we approached the front gate to the base, there were comments in the car about the Tuesday protesters who were at the gate protesting. Like my dad, who was career Army, had always done, I gave a disparaging remark against the protesters. My commander, a full bird colonel who had spent most of his military life in Europe, faced off against the Iron Curtain, stopped me right there.

He told me that those protesters were doing a valuable thing. He explained to me they were proving that I had done my job well. He told me I had sworn an oath to defend the Constitution. And those protesters at the front gate proved that I had done my job well. He said it was the Constitution which allowed them to be there and voice their opinion in the first place.

I had to think about that, and I realized he was right. Every person who serves in the military takes an oath to uphold and protect the Constitution of the United States. The fact that the Bill of Rights lives and is used stands as an essential testament to the hard work and perseverance everyone in the military has given to this country.

It is important to note that the Bill of Rights is not a cafeteria type document. In other words, you cannot use the amendments you like and condemned the amendments you don’t want. If you want the second amendment on gun control, you have to accept the First Amendment on freedom of speech. If you want the Fifth Amendment against self-incrimination, you have to take all 10 amendments.

Why were those protesters so important, though? It falls to one other fundamental truth. Freedoms not used because of any fear, are never free. I am proud to have defended the Constitution of the United States, and I am thrilled to live in a free land.