Puzzles and Tools

I love to solve puzzles. Wooden puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, escape the room puzzles, sudoku, and crossword puzzles. I like to work on all kinds of problems. It keeps my mind sharper, there is a feeling of euphoria when solving a hard puzzle, and I find insights into some of my other concerns that I might’ve missed otherwise.

Some people hate puzzles, and I understand why. Many times, the person working the problem is looking for an easy solution or something with just a few steps in it. Failing to find an immediate answer, the would-be puzzle solver gives a shrug of the shoulders and says that the puzzle could not be solved. The next time the particular puzzle style comes around, the person merely says, ‘I can never solve those, it just can’t be done.’

When I was younger, I also used to get frustrated and give up puzzles. Then, I learned and started practicing with a couple of rudimentary mental tools which made solving the puzzle much easier. And later I discovered these mental tools have far greater uses. These tools can actually help us in many other areas of our lives.

I learned that solving puzzles and gaining knowledge in business and life had to start with the belief that the problems could be solved.  This is probably the most important of all the tools. Not believing that something is possible results in never putting forth the effort to actually accomplish it. We may give it lip service, yet most efforts are only halfhearted at best.

My next tool is knowledge. If I believe the puzzle can be solved, then I believe that, in most cases, someone somewhere has done this before. If they can do it, then I should be able to do it. I just need to take some time to explore the possibilities.

My third tool is understanding the possibilities. You need to look at all problems based on possible inputs and possible results. Don’t think about the impossible because more and more the impossible, is becoming probable, and might be able to be purchased within the next five years. Remember, the only thing impossible in technology are some of the folks you’ll meet along the way.

So today I give you three tools, belief, knowledge, and understanding the possibilities. Like any tool, these work best when used often and treated with care. There’s nothing worse than going out to the garden to use a tool and having to brush off all the cobwebs and take time to sharpen it before it becomes useful again.

Well, there’s the mean old master sergeant’s thought again. Thanks for being with me, I hope to be with you again tomorrow.

Trust

When we buy a candy bar, we trust it’s going to be like all the other candy bars of that type we have purchased before. When we get ready to eat the candy bar, if we open it and the chocolate is old and stale, and the creamy insides are is hard as a rock, we may throw the candy bar away. After all, it’s only a candy bar.

When we go out to a restaurant, and we order something, we trust that they will serve us what we ordered. We trust our order will be made under sanitary conditions with care and it will be edible. If we are disappointed in what is served us, we may send it back or even remove the restaurant from our places to frequent. After all, it’s only a meal.

When we order courses off the web to learn something new or to expand our horizons, we trust that we are getting what was offered in the promotion of the course. If we were told that the course was for us and could solve specific problems that we had, we trust that is what is going to happen. As we pay for that course, the results for us need to stack up to the promises made and the cost of the course. This is important because what we study and learn will influence us as we move into our future.

Some people trying to convince others that their course is valuable and essential will charge thousands of dollars for it. They have been taught and live under a belief that a course not costing thousands of dollars cannot possibly be a good course. I am not sure that is so, and in charging high prices, I am probably not going to get to teach some of the students who could really benefit from my training.

I have studied education and training most of my life. I have always both worked and volunteered in part as a trainer and a coach. I have the academic degrees to back it up. And I trust in my skill and motivation. I have no plans to charge you thousands of dollars for something when I can give you a much lower and reasonable price. Don’t get me wrong, if you feel you have to pay me thousands of dollars, okay. Yet, I would have to ask the question, why?

When you take one of my courses, I am trusting that you signed up because you really need the course, or really want the course. I trust you are going to take the course seriously, I have faith that you will do your best to learn what I am teaching. And I believe that you will use the knowledge to better yourself and/or those around you.

I am working on a real active trust and faith which I haven’t quite ironed out yet. I do hope that I can have it figured out and completed by Tuesday of next week (October 2) I will talk about this on that day whether I can accomplish it or not and I think it’s something you might want to read. If it works, it’ll be an excellent offer for you.

Until then I am trusting you will have a good day. And, I hope to be with you again tomorrow.