What Is Your Footprint Like?

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When we walk the earth, we can leave a footprint of what our worth to others is. The footprint is not actually an impression in mud that can be so easily washed away. The imprint is what we leave in the minds and in the hearts of others whom we interact with along the way. And quite often it is what we did for them that makes us memorable.

You know people whom you have never personally met, who have passed from this earth long ago, and yet it’s still their deeds that are the cause of how you remember them. George Washington, who helped found our country and was our first president. You may remember Alexander Graham Bell when you make a phone call. You may think of Steve Jobs, who helped bring new ideas in computing and entertainment into our world. These three people and thousands more are remembered for the work that they had done with and for others.

We need to consider what the footprint we leave behind will look like. It has been said that most people cannot remember further back than their great-grandmother. This is because family generations farther back either had very little or absolutely no interaction with those family members of today. Unless you had a direct connection with Margaret Wummer, you probably would not know her. Although she did incredible things, raising her children and grandchildren, helping in her church, and generously donating to her community.

It is essential for us not to keep our talents bottled up within us. For we are here to work as a team and to grow as cultures and societies. The more we do, the more we touch other people. And, the more connections we have, the more likely we are to be remembered. It is vital to work with others both for their sake and definitely for ours.

Keeping your talents to yourself means that you are the only one who ever benefits from them. That means that you have a lot of good in you, which is never seen or used. People like to talk about the positives in life around them. They also have a tendency to gloss over the ordinary things and those that are minorly annoying.

I’m not saying we all need to invent the computer or the telephone. Also, I think we might get in trouble if we try to establish our own country. Yet, we can do what we can do to help others. And that is important because we know that there are times when we will need help ourselves. We are not trading, we are sharing. And I believe that’s why talents are given to us to start.

Thank you for being with me today. I hope to be with you again tomorrow.

Author: Mike Balof

A retired Air Force Master Sergeant, Mike used to lay in bed at night and worry about what would happen if his plant closed or found himself without a job. One day his plant closed. Rather than panic and hysteria (OK, maybe a little) Mike found himself carried away on the adventure of his life. Mike started with the best job he ever had working at Home Depot. He spent 8 years working with job seekers at a local workforce center, helping them to find employment. He then started his own company developing courses, writing books and urging others to follow their own paths into the future. Mike holds a Master of Arts in Adult Education and Training and a Bachelor of Business Management, earned through the University of Phoenix and an AAS degree in Electronics Systems Technology from the Community College of the Air Force. Mike is a member of the Delta Mu Delta Business Honor Society.

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